11.14.2013

Informal Poll.






The other day I got in these gorgeous organic cotton fabrics and organic cotton thread.  They are GOTS certified- meaning they have the approval of the Global Organic Textile Standard.  The aim of GOTS (from their site) is as follows:

"The aim of the standard is to define world-wide recognised requirements that ensure organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials, through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing up to labelling in order to provide a credible assurance to the end consumer.
Textile processors and manufacturers are enabled to export their organic fabrics and garments with one certification accepted in all major markets."

The ctireria:

"The consensus of the International Working Group was that a clear and unambiguous understanding of the content required that the Global Standard itself focuses on compulsory criteria only. The standard covers the processing, manufacturing, packaging, labelling, trading and distribution of all textiles made from at least 70% certified organic natural fibres. The final products may include, but are not limited to fibre products, yarns, fabrics, clothes and home textiles. The standard does not set criteria for leather products."

My question to you, my readers: Is it counter-intuitive to pair these organic cottons with leather?  As in, if I made something like this:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/161134155/oversized-foldover-clutch-leather-bottom?ref=shop_home_feat

...does that then go against the whole point of using organic cotton?  Would doing that alienate the group I may be trying to reach by using organics?

Thoughts?

12 comments:

  1. For me personally, it is peculiar to pair organics with leather, and in a way, defeats the purpose of "organic".
    I don't buy any leather products though, because while I'm not fully vegan (I'm a pescepollotarian, but only pasture-raised chicken and sustainable seafood) I try not to buy non-food products that require animals to die. The tanning process is also quite toxic and dangerous to the humans involved (particularly along the Ganges). Vegan/faux leather is no longer the pleather of the 90s; it's a much higher quality material, so I get really excited when sites with products to which I'm attracted (like yours!) offer vegan leather or non-leather options.
    Sorry for the soapbox lecture… but I wanted to explain why it's a turn-off to me!

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  2. There actually is organically raised and organically tanned leather out there that you could pair it with. {organicleather-dot-com} The toxic tanning processes of the past are being replaced by more sustainable and savvy methods. If you do pair organic material with leather {and market it as such}, I'd make sure that the whole product lives up to the label - meaning it's naturally and sustainably sourced.

    There are a lot of alternatives out there, though, that would bypass leather altogether, be more sustainable and environmentally responsible, and still look sharp: ecouterre-dot-com/7-eco-friendly-and-vegan-alternatives-to-animal-leather/

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  3. Wow, thanks for sharing that! It looks as though there aren't too many people supplying organic leather as yet but it seems like something that would be good to watch and see if it becomes popular. Sustainable materials are hard to find in general, which is unfortunate. I would want something marketed as organic to be true to that label, so I don't know if I would go for the leather alternatives just because you don't really know what you're getting, and many of those are filled with plastics. I love finding out more though, so you can bet I'm going to dig into it further!

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  4. I think you're right on both counts- I don't think it would make sense to pair them together and market it as organic now that I really think about it (but they WOULD look fabulous together!).


    The problem with faux, as I mentioned to KC, is that a lot of that is plastic-based so you'd have to be very careful what you ordered, and then you couldn't market it as eco/sustainable anyway. So tough!

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  5. I don't mind soapboxes- I always learn something! I total understand what you mean about the tanning process and animal rights issues. Right now what I use are remnant pieces - leftovers that were unwanted for whatever reason - so it makes me feel a little better to use something that might otherwise have been tossed.


    I would totally be open to using faux leather but I doubt I would pair it with organic cotton, though, since, as I mentioned above, the available materials are usually a combination of plastics. I'm really interested in seeing what's available now!

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  6. I definitely see your point- and I prefer natural fibers, since synthetics are just long-term pollutants, really. Most of my clothes are cotton/linen/wool, and accessories I prefer the aforementioned and canvas/hemp. But I do have some vegan leather shoes for the look, I admit. And I still wear my leather shoes I bought before making this choice, since it'd be financially wasteful to donate them when I still like the style and already own them!


    I definitely appreciate your using remnants- and, in truth, most affordable shoe and handbag leather is from byproducts of other industries. Only some of the higher-end brands use veal-production leather and such (which is still technically a byproduct…).
    So the reuse/recycle part of me loves that you're using cast-off remnants, and the earth-friendly part of me isn't keen on synthetic "leathers" or leather tanning, but the animal-lover part of me usually wins, and so that's the reason for my choices! I'm totally open to the fact that there are many different, but equally "right" views- as long as we're all operating consciously and ethically, which I do think you are, just from a different angle!

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  7. I think you're right about what you say- there's a give and take part in all of this, it just depends on how you look at it and what your overall purpose is. Which unfortunately makes it hard when you are trying to find the right materials to market to one group. It makes it really interesting, though, to look at it from other people's angles, which you don't often get a chance to do and that's why I love hearing the other perspective.

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  8. memoriesforlifescrapbooksNovember 14, 2013 at 5:31 PM

    I didn't realize that about the faux leather. That really stinks.
    I'd definitely say to keep making them though...just redirect your marketing. And use a different style fabric if needed.

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  9. Wow everyone else seems to have really great comments on this one and I agree with the consensus that if you are going to tag/title them as organic on Etsy, I wouldn't recommend pairing with the leather. Unless as others said, you could find organic leather. All the fabrics you got are really pretty and would look great as pouches too! :)

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  10. I was definitely thinking pouches, with some sort of snap or strap closure, since organic zippers are limited in color. I think I will just stick with the leather on other items. :)

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  11. LeAnn Larson FrobomNovember 22, 2013 at 3:53 PM

    I love the look of the pouch, but I'd use something other leather, I think.

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  12. Thank you! Me too- luckily that one is not organic fabric! I think I'll have to try and come up with something else for the new threads. :)

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